632 E. First Street, Dayton, OH 45402
Jul

NRDC Recognizes Energy Optimizers, USA for Growth and Efficiency

On July 26th, Dylan Sullivan from the Natural Resources Defense Council highlighted Energy Optimizers, USA as a conservative company that confounds political stereotypes by highlighting green energy’s broad appeal. In the article Sullivan also identifies how quickly our small Ohio company has grown in the past year by applying solid principles of value to our work.

In the article company president Greg Smith shared, “We’ve gone from one employee less than two years ago – me – to 14 employees”. The NRDC article goes on to identify the University of Dayton’s Renewable and Clean Energy Program as well as Ohio Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standard, legislation which is often used to fund projects such as the energy efficiency projects at Jackson City Schools that will lower its current $1 million energy bill by close to $160,000 annually.

Read the entire article on the NRDC website here.

Jul

Dayton Regional Green 3 Awards Energy Optimizers, USA with Green Business Certification

On Wednesday, July 6, 2011, Dayton Regional Green 3 (DRG3) recognized 14 local businesses from Montgomery and surrounding counties that have taken voluntary steps to protect, preserve, and improve the environment.

The businesses receiving DRG3 Green Business Certification are:

  • AAA Wastewater  (Green & Blue Certification)
  • APG Office Furnishings
  • Aullwood Audubon Center and Farm  (Green & Blue Certification)
  • CYP Studios  (Green & Blue Certification)
  • Elements IV Interiors
  • Energy Optimizers, USA
  • Good Samaritan Hospital
  • Heapy Engineering  (Green & Blue Certification)
  • Miami Conservancy District
  • Montgomery County Madison Lakes Learning & Conference Center
  • Montgomery County Water Services
  • Montgomery County Solid Waste District  (Green & Blue Certification)
  • Salem Office Products
  • Square One Salon

Green Business Certification Program

The Green Business Certification Program is a voluntary program designed to help businesses take basic green measures to reduce their ecological footprint, reduce their energy and resource use, and save money in the process.  Businesses are also eligible for Water Stewardship Blue Certification.

In the fall of 2007, Montgomery County Commissioners convened a forum of local citizens, government and business leaders to identify strategies to reduce the carbon footprint in Montgomery County and the region.  From the initial meetings, the name Dayton Regional Green 3 Task Force and the DRG3 label was developed in an effort to open the Task Force’s efforts to include all of the Dayton Region and not limit it to Montgomery County.DGR3 has three main areas of focus:  Residential, Business, and Government, with an emphasis on economic development, policy, and education.  To learn more, visit:  http://www.mcohio.org and click on the DRG3 logo.

 

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Jun

Bethel and Covington Schools along with Energy Optimizers, USA Implement Energy Conservation Projects

TIPP CITY, Ohio, June 16, 2011 (SEND2PRESS NEWSWIRE) — Superintendents at Bethel Local and Covington Exempted Village Schools announce that the districts will be implementing energy conservation projects to reduce energy usage and cost and to save taxpayer dollars. Energy Optimizers, USA has been working with both Miami County school districts to develop complete turn-key energy conservation solutions. To implement these projects without asking for any taxpayer money, Energy Optimizers, USA and the school districts are utilizing funding mechanisms through the Ohio School Facilities Commission’s House Bill 264 program.

Energy Savings for the Bethel Local School District:

Energy Optimizers, USA has designed the Bethel District project to include a building automation control system to utilize advanced energy conservation programs to control the heating, cooling and ventilation systems. Lighting upgrades will significantly reduce the electrical load and improve the energy efficiency and quality of light in the facility. Solar powered automatic restroom sinks and a solar thermal domestic hot water system will be installed, saving energy and water while serving as an educational tool for the students and community. New HVAC systems will be installed in the High School, Junior High, and 1969 Elementary wings. Superintendent Jeff Cassell explains that, “while the project cost is $633,290, it will reduce utility, operating and maintenance costs annually by at least $58,465.”

Energy Savings for the Covington Exempted Village School District:

A basic direct digital control system will be installed to control each of the District’s boiler systems. Numerous lighting upgrades will be made in each of the three buildings to improve the quality of lighting and reduce the electrical load and energy cost. Middle School urinal retrofits will significantly reduce the water and sewer usages. Steam trap retrofits will be made within the HVAC systems at the Middle School and High School, and exposed main steam pipe lines will be insulated to reduce energy loss.

The project cost is $136,100, and anticipated annual utility, operating and maintenance savings are estimated at a minimum of $42,832. The district will realize a net annual cash flow of $30,912 after making annual payments on the project, which will result in a 5.78 year payback including interest. Superintendent Randy Earl states that, “As an administrator, it is my responsibility to ensure that our district is a good steward of taxpayers’ money. I feel that the Covington School District is doing just that by implementing this exciting project.”

Energy Education Program:

Energy Optimizers, USA will work with both school districts to implement an energy education and training program, tied to the curriculum, for students and staff. Activities will include creating and implementing a district-wide energy conservation handbook incorporating suggested student and staff behaviors and expectations that directly affect energy usage, and having the school districts qualify for and become recognized by the Federal Energy Star Energy Efficient Buildings Program.

Greg Smith, President of Energy Optimizers, USA, stated, “We are extremely excited to be working with these Miami County Schools to not only save them a substantial amount of money, but also save the environment and provide their students with a unique educational opportunity and possibly springboard interested students into the field of energy efficiency and/or the renewable energy field. We will also be providing a graduating student from each district interested in the energy and/or engineering field with a $1,000 scholarship during the 2011-12 school year.”

About Energy Optimizers, USA:

Energy Optimizers, USA works with Ohio school districts and government agencies to implement energy savings opportunities to reduce operational costs, including lighting retrofits, renewable energy projects (wind and solar), HVAC retrofit projects, building automation retrofits and energy education programs. To learn more about Energy Optimizers, USA, visit their website at http://energyoptimizersusa.com or call them at (937) 877-1919.

Jun

Eaton Community Schools and Energy Optimizers, USA Implement $2 Million Energy Conservation Project

TIPP CITY, Ohio, May 26, 2011 (SEND2PRESS NEWSWIRE) — Eaton Community Schools Superintendent Brad Neavin announces that the school district will establish a “Green Team” of staff and students that will both develop and deliver the District’s energy education program, sponsored by Energy Optimizers, USA. Greg Smith, President of Energy Optimizers, USA, and Mr. Neavin announced that Eaton High School students who participate in the Green Team can apply for one of several college scholarships that will be awarded in the 2011-12 school year, for a total of $5,000, to be donated by Energy Optimizers, USA.

Energy Savings for the School District:

The Green Team Program, which also includes a grant for a $7,500 district “Energy Bike” and $1,500 worth of educational classroom energy activity kits, is all part of the $2 Million energy conservation project being implemented at the school district’s facilities. These projects will reduce the District’s annual energy costs by more than $240,000 per year.

Middle School Student Education and Involvement:

As part of the Ohio Energy Project’s AEGIS (Activating and Energizing Girls in Science) summer program, a team of female middle school students, accompanied by a teacher, will spend three days building an Energy Bike and learning leadership skills. The Energy Bike facilitates comprehensive understanding of the transformation of energy and of the importance of energy conservation. The students will then utilize the Energy Bike to teach the students in the lower grades about kinetic energy by demonstrating how pedaling of the bike transforms energy to electricity that can then be used in everyday life – powering light bulbs, radios, etc. The program is designed to spark girls’ interest in engineering, science- and math-related jobs.

About Energy Optimizers, USA:

Energy Optimizers, USA works with Ohio school districts and government agencies to implement energy savings opportunities to reduce operational costs, including lighting retrofits, renewable energy projects (wind and solar), HVAC retrofit projects, building automation retrofits and Energy Education Programs. To learn more about Energy Optimizers, USA, visit their website at http://energyoptimizersusa.com or call them at (937) 877-1919.

Media Contact:
Belinda Kenley
Energy Optimizers, USA
Phone 937-877-1919.

Apr

Energy Management System Advances Produce Big Cuts in Heating, Ventilation, and A/C Costs

Dennis Coe can laugh about it now. At the time, however, the superintendent of Henry County Schools wasn’t quite so amused by the wattage-wasting antics of his students and staff. He was working overtime, he says, “just to keep the lights of the school on.”

Faced with drastic cuts to his utility budget, Coe had resorted to somewhat draconian measures to save energy and cut costs, including putting lockboxes on the thermostats so that teachers and students couldn’t control the temperature. But the utility bill kept creeping up.

The superintendent decided to start investigating. What he uncovered was a surprising bit of mischief. “I actually had one situation in a gym where kids, unbeknownst to the teacher, had pried the lockbox to the thermostat open so they could take it off, adjust the thermostat, and put it back on before the teacher could find out,” he says with a chuckle.

The problem wasn’t only limited to sweaty students looking to cool down during gym class: Coe found that in the off-hours and over summer break, contracted workers were coming in and bumping the thermostat down to 60 degrees or below to keep it cool while rewaxing the floors and performing other maintenance. “The bills were just astronomical,” he says.

So Coe decided enough was enough. Last year, he contracted with energy management solutions provider Schneider Electric to install a “smart” system that automates heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) for all five of the Henry County schools–taking control, quite literally, out of everyone’s hands.

The new IP-networked system, which was completed in February, ties all the thermostats in the district via cabling to a central computer housed in–none other than–the superintendent’s office. From there, Coe and his staff can tailor temperatures to a school’s schedule, turning the A/C on in the gymnasium for a basketball game one day and a beauty pageant in the auditorium the next. The system will ensure that HVAC equipment is turned off when the building is unoccupied and that the temperature never dips below a certain set point.

No one has to be uncomfortable, of course; classrooms are set at 74 degrees for cooling and 68 degrees for heat, but teachers are given a 3-degree variance so they can adjust the temperature if students are complaining. The days of 60-degree cleaning sessions, however, are a thing of the past.

All in all, the system is expected to save the district about $90,000 a year and slash energy consumption by 20 percent–sizable savings for a small, rural school system with roughly 2,900 students. And the savings will be achieved all while enrollment and technology demands increase in the years to come.

Sophisticated Monitoring

Energy management systems are nothing new, of course; for example, Texas’ Corpus Christi Independent School District automated its HVAC and lighting over 10 years ago as a way to keep ballooning electricity costs in check. With the district’s 4,000 classrooms, close to 40,000 students, and 20,000 computers, behavior modification alone wasn’t going to make a dent in its $11 million-a-year electrical budget.

What is new, however, is how sophisticated these systems have become. In Corpus Christi, setting the air conditioners to turn off at the end of the day is just a start; recent modifications to its air distribution system allow district buildings to “adapt” to changing conditions, including humidity levels. By running the air conditioner longer–but at a lower air volume–the equipment doesn’t work any harder than it has to; the school can dehumidify the air without freezing out occupants. That’s crucial for a high-humidity, high-heat environment like Corpus Christi, where year-round air conditioning costs can add up quickly.

The system is also able to adjust to the number of occupants in a room. “It’s just not economically feasible to leave on an air conditioner that runs $235 an hour for one person,” says Scott Kucera, energy and facilities coordinator for the district.

His district has realized a $1 million-a-year payoff from its customized Schneider system, whose four-phase implementation over the past decade has also included a districtwide lighting retrofit, a computer system overhaul, and motion sensors–the installation of which will be completed this summer.

At The Hotchkiss School, a private institution founded in 1891 in Lakeville, CT, a newly installed Honeywell energy-information application works with existing building controls to analyze energy consumption in real time–allowing staff to make sure its historic buildings run as efficiently as its modern ones.

Facility managers can look at weather reports, even market conditions, to understand usage patterns and tweak the system accordingly. The system also automatically cuts energy use during periods of high demand–such as modifying temperature set points or cycling chillers on and off–helping Hotchkiss avoid higher peak-period utility costs. All told, the school has realized a return on investment of 153 percent on its energy-efficiency projects in the past three years.

These smart systems also bear the important reward of time saved. In Corpus Christi, Kucera and his meager staff of two (one assistant, one secretary) are tasked with overseeing the energy management of 60 campuses. “If a teacher calls and says, ‘It’s hot in here,’ [now] we can look at the temperature of a room and say, ‘No, it isn’t’ or ‘Yes, it is,'” Kucera says. “And we can actually diagnose the system. Before our mechanic even leaves, he knows where to go and what’s broken.”

These diagnostic features will no doubt be saving Henry County man-hours, too, since before the new system went in a teacher had to call someone in maintenance “just to adjust the temperature in the room,” says Coe.

And at Hotchkiss, the ability to monitor systems remotely helped avert potential disaster when a winter warm spell triggered a heat pump malfunction in the boiler plant, causing a safety pressure release valve to blow off and antifreeze to spill into the room. Alarms on the smart system immediately notified maintenance technicians, who were then able to use the system to write an emergency work-around and restart the pump.

Finding the Funds

The snag, of course, is that while districts are saving loads of money, many can’t afford to make these implementations to begin with. “Of course, it’s a bit cliché to say that school districts are tight on money,” a Schneider Electric spokesperson says. “But now more than any time before in their history, districts are challenged to make sure that every dollar they get is funneled into the classroom.”

In Henry County, for instance, where money for school utilities comes from local taxes, not the state, high unemployment rates and shrinking tax revenues left Coe wondering how he would modernize his facility.

Enter the performance contract, which allowed the district to completely fund its smart system with the money saved in energy each year. What’s more, Henry County’s annual $90,000 savings is guaranteed, as long as the school is implementing and following Schneider’s energy plan. “We couldn’t see any negatives to it,” says Coe. “When the savings are guaranteed, when you’re able to take those funds that are saved and invest them back into your building to make it more energy-efficient, really with no extra cost–that was a no-brainer.”

Once the project is paid off, schools can choose to invest those extra funds as they see fit, either directing them toward more equipment or diverting them to other projects. Corpus Christi paid off its performance contract several years ago; now it’s looking a using its annual $1 million savings for other energy-efficiency efforts, like retrofitting its older schools to achieve LEED certification.

With the money saved in Henry County, Coe may one day be able to take a more serious look at his district’s energy-efficiency wish list, which includes a water management plan complete with flushless urinals.

And maybe soon, Coe will be able to count on those wattage-wasting staff and students for energy-saving aid. In Corpus Christi, Kucera has seen the folks in his district grow smarter about conservation now that they’ve seen the smart system in action. Whereas he used to have a hard time convincing teachers that they couldn’t work in the classroom all weekend long with the A/C running, he now receives daily suggestions as to how the district can save even more money.

“It’s funny,” Kucera says. “Once you get people changed from wasting energy to saving it, they really jump on board.”

As found contributed by Jennifer Grayson at the journal

Mar

Why Harrison High School is Saving Money

Students Jacob and Adam along with Energy Optimizers, USA President Greg Smith
Students Jacob and Adam along with Energy Optimizers, USA President Greg Smith

In a recent visit to Harrison High School, Greg Smith met with school administrators, educators, and students on the progress of their energy-saving changes made to their facilities.

Alyssa, Jacob and Adam, students from Harrison, came along for the energy facility walk through where Greg pointed out many of the energy-saving changes already made to the building. The facility inspection included observing lighting levels, HVAC and water system performance monitoring, enclosure enhancements as well as the solar array.

About Energy Education Programs

As an integral part of the energy changes made to school facilities, Energy Optimizers, USA delivers a comprehensive education program for students so that they can understand the changes made (or being made) to their school and what it means to them, their parents and the environment. This comprehensive approach allows students to provide feedback to Energy Optimizers, USA as well as school administrators on how to better tend to the energy savings of the building they all occupy.

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Feb

Springfield Schools Slash Lighting Costs

As published in School Planning & Management
by Michael Fickes
K-12 schools across the country can cut electricity bills dramatically by retrofitting with energy efficient fluorescent lamps, adding occupancy sensors and implementing daylighting strategies where possible. In some schools, emerging LED technology can cut electricity costs even more than fluorescent lighting in certain applications. Some districts are also experimenting with more general use of LED lighting.
The Springfield City School District in Springfield, Ohio, recently upgraded its lighting technology in the hopes of reducing lighting costs without compromising quality.

It worked. The district spent $332,400 on retrofit lighting gear and labor and will save $104,240 per year in electricity costs, recouping the cost of the upgrade in a little over three years.

K-12 schools across the country can cut electricity bills dramatically by retrofitting with energy efficient fluorescent lamps, adding occupancy sensors and implementing daylighting strategies where possible.

In some schools, emerging LED technology can cut electricity costs even more than fluorescent lighting in certain applications. Some districts are also experimenting with more general use of LED lighting.

The Springfield City School District project touched eight elementary schools, four middle schools and one high school.

The retrofit replaced 32-watt T-8 lamps with 28-watt T-8 lamps in classrooms, offices and corridors, says Greg Smith, president of Energy Optimizers USA, who handled the project. Based in Tipp City, Ohio, Energy Optimizers specializes in energy conservation projects for K-12 schools.

Adding to the savings, three-lamp fixtures with reflector kits replaced four-lamp fixtures in the classrooms, and two-lamp fixtures with reflector kits replaced three-lamp fixtures in the corridors.

In the gymnasium, they replaced electricity-hungry metal halide lamps with new six-lamp T-8 fluorescent fixtures and lamps plus occupancy sensors.

Energy Optimizers also equipped the restrooms, hallways and large areas of the school with occupancy sensors that turn off the lights when no people are present.

“Springfield City illustrates the savings that districts with newer buildings can expect,” Smith says. “Districts with older buildings have additional opportunities. For example, you can replace incandescent exit signs with LED exit signs.”

Older schools often have exit signs illuminated by incandescent lamps, which typically draw 40 watts. LED signs draw just four watts. In addition, LEDs last for years and require virtually no maintenance hours for changing lamps. Estimates place the 10-year cost of one incandescent exit sign at $535.20. That doesn’t seem out of line, unless, of course, you compare it to the 10-year cost of one LED exit sign: $76.50, less than $10 per year.

A school district with 1,000 exit signs across 50 or so school buildings and a dozen or so administrative and maintenance facilities can exchange incandescent exit signs for LED signs and reduce electricity costs from $535,200 to $76,500 over 10 years and from $53,520 to $7650 per year.

Improving Lighting Technology, Declining Lighting Costs
While LED lighting is gaining credibility in some school lighting applications, four-foot long fluorescent lamps remain the K-12 workhorse. Mounted in standard two-foot by four-foot fixtures, these lamps have made steady improvements in energy efficiency over the years.

Twenty years ago, 40-watt T-12 fluorescent lamps provided most of the lighting for K-12 classrooms, offices and corridors. By the middle of the 1990s, 32-watt T-8 lamps had replaced the T-12s. T-8 lamps remain prevalent today.

T-12 and T-8 lamps. What’s the difference? Each comes as a four-foot tube. The difference is the diameter of the tubes. A T-12 lamp is 12/8 of an inch or 1 ½ – inches in diameter. A T-8 lamp is 8/8 inch or 1 inch in diameter.

In short, the T-number reflects the number of eighths of an inch in the diameter; the lower the number, the smaller the diameter.

Likewise, recently introduced T-5 lamps are 5/8 of an inch in diameter.

Experts doubt that T-5s are ready to take over. T-5 lamps operate at 28 watts, the same wattage as T-8s. “Moreover, the T-5 ballasts use slightly more wattage than T-8 ballasts, making them less energy efficient overall,” says Patrick J. Marquez, PE, LEED-AP, an electrical project manager with Baltimore-based James Posey Associates, a consulting engineering firm that provides mechanical and electrical design and engineering services.

By reducing the diameter of the lamps, engineers generally reduce the amount of power consumed. While not true in the case of the T-5 lamp, it may eventually be true as the technology improves.

“In addition, smaller diameter lamps give fixture designers more flexibility and enable them to improve the optics of the fixtures,” continues Marquez. “While the power needs of T-5s aren’t less, the quality of the lighting is improving. That may be important in some installations.”

The Big Rooms
Lighting schemes for some larger school spaces are focusing on energy efficiency, too.

In the gymnasium, for instance, 150-watt metal halide lamps are losing out to T-8 and T-5 lamps that use about one-third of the wattage required by metal halide lamps. “Fluorescent lamps not only save energy, they solve a problem characteristic of HID (high-intensity discharge) lamps like metal halide, Marquez says. “HID lamps require five to 10 minutes to re-light after being turned off. If there is a power outage, the lights won’t come right back on. Fluorescent lamps don’t have that problem.”

Metal halide lamps also shift color over time; fluorescent lamps do not.

Cafeterias are also shifting to fluorescent lighting in middle schools and high schools. Elementary school cafeterias are a bit different.

Elementary school cafeterias often double as auditoriums and use two lighting systems. At mealtime, energy-efficient fluorescent lamps provide illumination. Auditoriums, however, require lights that can dim, brighten and cast a spotlight. “Incandescent and halogen lamps are easy to dim,” Marquez says. “Fluorescent fixtures offer dimming but not the same level of control. Incandescent and halogen lamps are here to stay in auditoriums.”

Daylighting Strategy
“Many studies note that natural daylight boosts student productivity,” Marquez says. “Our goal as lighting designers is to find the best way to bring daylight into a classroom without creating glare or heat.”

The idea is to harvest or use the natural daylight that comes through the windows of a classroom, supplementing it with artificial light when necessary and dimming the artificial light when natural light is available.

What About LED Lighting
Light emitting diodes (LEDs) are attracting attention as lighting sources that provide even more energy efficiency than fluorescent lamps, but only in certain applications. “Lighting in classrooms will continue to operate using linear format T-8 or T-5 fluorescent lamps, which can integrate with daylight harvesting systems,” says Al Near, senior vice president of sales and marketing with New Windsor, N.Y.- based USA Illumination, a lighting manufacturer that provides efficient lighting solutions for a variety of faciltiies.

Marquez agrees. “We don’t see LED as a good alternative for linear 4-foot fluorescent tubes,” he says. “Making a linear LED tube requires stringing together a lot of LEDs. We’ve seen a couple of these, but I don’t think they do the lighting job, and they require large power supplies that generate a lot of heat.”

LED lighting can handle specialty applications, however. LEDs provide down lighting in hallways and highlighting for architectural features. “It is an excellent decorative light,” Marquez says.

“Lighting costs make up 50 to 60 percent of a typical school electricity bill,” Smith says. “The next largest electricity user is the HVAC system.”

As the power requirements of fluorescent lamps and LED lights continue to shrink, it is becoming possible to shrink the percentage of electricity used by lighting systems. How low can you go? Lighting will always be a major component of school utility costs, but by applying new, efficient lighting technologies and adopting lower wattage lamps as they become available, it may be possible to cede the title of top electricity guzzler to the heating, ventilating and air conditioning system.

Source: SP&M, November 2010

Jan

Spotlight: Belinda Kenley – Vice President of Operations

Belinda Kenley has joined Energy Optimizers, USA, as Vice President of Operations, announces President Greg Smith.  She will be responsible for project administration and management, sales and operating activities, and managing the Maintenance Plan Advisor program for school districts.

Kenley, who serves on Centerville City Council, is a graduate of Sinclair Community College and the Jo Ann Davidson Ohio Leadership Institute.   She brings significant experience in management, marketing, and government to Energy Optimizers, USA.  She is involved in numerous community organizations, including the Dayton Area Chamber of Commerce, the South Metro Regional Chamber of Commerce, and the Centerville Women’s Civic Club, among others.

Kenley serves on the National League of Cities Community & Economic Development Steering Committee.  She was recognized recently by Women in Business Networking as one of the year’s “25 Women To Watch”.  Ohio’s former Auditor of State Betty D. Montgomery awarded her the Distinguished Service Award in 2003 for her work with the Attorney General’s office and the Auditor of State’s office.   Belinda and her husband Robert live in Centerville.

About Energy Optimizers, USA

Energy Optimizers, USA is a company dedicated to increasing the energy efficiency and sustainability of K-12 school districts and local government agencies, while educating the staff and community so they can understand what they can do to make our environment a cleaner and safer place.

Jan

Spotlight: Josh Foor – Energy and Mechanical Engineer

Josh Foor is the newest member of the Energy Optimizers, USA team.  He joins the team as an Energy and Mechanical Engineer and will be primarily responsible for energy efficiency projects, lighting efficiency projects, and renewable energy projects.

Josh is a recent graduate from the University of Dayton School of Engineering with a Master’s degree in Renewable and Clean Energy as well as a Bachelor’s degree in Mechanical Engineering. He has an eager young mind and an incredible enthusiasm for the energy and efficiency field.  Josh hopes to contribute his hard work and knowledge to further strengthen the already strong Energy Optimizers, USA team.

About Energy Optimizers, USA

Energy Optimizers, USA is a company dedicated to increasing the energy efficiency and sustainability of K-12 school districts and local government agencies, while educating the staff and community so they can understand what they can do to make our environment a cleaner and safer place.

Jan

Eaton Community Schools – Going Green

TIPP CITY, Ohio – Energy Optimizers, USA, located in Tipp City, Ohio, is assisting the Eaton Community School District, located in Eaton, Ohio, to GO GREEN and SAVE GREEN, Money. The school district is enhancing their school facility’s HVAC systems, lighting systems, kitchen equipment, computer network systems, and air filtration systems, and implementing renewable energy projects, including solar thermal systems, to reduce their annual energy costs by more than $225,000 per year.

In addition to making these energy savings facility enhancements, the district is also implementing an Energy Education Program designed to include the students, staff and community in the project and use the project as a learning tool for the entire community.

Brad Neavin, Superintendent of Eaton Schools, stated, “We are excited to partner with Energy Optimizers, USA to significantly reduce our operational expenses while also providing our students and community an excellent educational opportunity. As an administrator, it is my responsibility to ensure that our district is a good steward of the taxpayers’ money. I feel that the Eaton Community School District is doing just that by implementing this exciting project.”

Greg Smith, President of Energy Optimizers, USA, stated, “We are extremely excited to be working with Eaton Community Schools to not only save them a substantial amount of money, but also save the environment and provide their students with a unique educational opportunity and possibly springboard interested students into the field of energy efficiency and/or the renewable energy field. We will also be providing a graduating student interested in the energy and/or engineering field with a $2,500 scholarship for the next three years.”

To implement this project without asking for any taxpayer money, Energy Optimizers, USA and the school district are utilizing funding mechanisms through the Ohio School Facilities Commission’s House Bill 264 program. Energy Optimizers, USA’s unique approach to the HB264 program, “Self-Direct HB264”, will allow the district to save more than $400,000 in total project costs.

About Energy Optimizers, USA
Energy Optimizers, USA audits, recommends and executes energy saving changes that make Ohio’s schools more efficient, greatly reducing their cost of operations. All across Ohio, Energy Optimizers, USA is implementing energy savings and conservation opportunities with school districts, including lighting and HVAC retrofits, building controls retrofits, wind and solar installations. Their programs include Energy Savings Projects, Wind & Solar Projects, Maintenance Plan Advisor Services and Energy Efficiency Education and Awareness Programs.
To learn more about Energy Optimizers, USA, visit their website at http://energyoptimizersusa.com or call them at (937) 877-1919.

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